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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 104 (some duplicates have been removed)
environment. the east coast of the united states is waking up to what could soon be a super storm. 140 kilometers per hour winds battering large areas as the hurricane grows in strength. sandy is expected to bring with it a life-threatening storm surge. these are live pictures from new york. the city waking up in darkness at the moment. in maryland, residents are bracing for the category one hurricane. this is live from maryland. 50 million people are affected on the east coast. schools and transport has been closed down. mandatory evacuation of hundreds of thousands of people caught in low-lying areas of new york city. the stock market is closed in new york. national air travel affected. many airlines affected and have had to cancel flights in and out. another piece of breaking news, 17 people have abandoned ship while stranded at sea off north carolina because of the hurricane, according to the u.s. coast guard of. teen-person crew took light jacket and went into the lifeboats -- a ten-person crew. now more from our correspondents. >> hurricane sandy churning waters off the new jerse
. as i mentioned before, knowing the director of environment is here and car sharing organizations are here as well, we're happy to answer questions. >> i have a couple questions. going back to that [speaker not understood] that you have up on the implementation of the timeline -- excuse me -- i was wondering if there are any specifics that you could also queue us on what is exactly legislative changes could possibly be. it might be too early for you to expand on this particular question. my second question is looking at one-way car sharing in implementation. >> yes. so, on the first question, i don't think we know yet if we would need legislative changes. as we finish the evaluation of the on-street, if there are things we need to tweak from the approvals the mta and the board of supervisors already granted in divisions 1 and 2 of the transportation code, we'll bring those forward. those changes authorize not just a pilot, but authorize a change in law for an ongoing program. so, it may be that we don't need anything else legislatively to happen. but if we do, we would bring that
in the oceans. some forms of life flourish in this salty environment. but humans require an abundant supply of freshwater. less than 1% of all the earth's water is readily available for human consumption. in the semi-arid desert plains of the southwest united states, where rainfall averages just 2 1/2 centimeters per month, tom maddock studies this scarce resource. dr. maddock: the real problem that we have is that with increasing populations and shortages of water, we are becoming very vulnerable. in the southwest, there's a very unique vulnerability here, simply because where do we get the water if there is no water? narrator: across the country in northern florida, the quantity of water isn't an issue. rainfall averages an abundant 1 1/4 meters each year. wendy graham and her colleagues evaluate and model the impacts of industrial and agricultural land use threatening the world's largest collection of freshwater springs. dr. graham: right now, the biggest question is how far we can stress the system and not push it past the point of no return. narrator: both researchers are working towar
mastered already? what type of environment do you think would allow this child to practice old skills while challenging her to develop new ones? let's remember how important play is as the means children use to try out and practice new skills. what may look like simple reaching or pulling to us can really be this child's earliest efforts to master some vital large muscle skills. we want to make it into a swimming pool. woman: bring them over here now. hendrick: and large muscle skills include different kinds of activities. woman: no. right over here. child: where's the swimming pool? second child: we can't see! hendrick: teachers need to plan so that children can practice them all... while having fun. [children talking] child: this is hard work! hendrick: they need opportunities to develop upper body strength and expertise by pulling themselves up and hanging from apparatus; by swinging, and by rolling balls at targets and throwing bean bags. geronimo! teacher: hop. let me see some hopping. hendrick: they need opportunities to strengthen their lower bodies by jumping up and down... very goo
. second, to discuss with sfmta and the department of the environment, director, thanks for being here, on what your objectives are and strategies are for expanding car sharing into neighborhoods. and third, have a thoughtful discussion with departments and stakeholders hereof a possibility of implementing one-way car sharing programs here in san francisco. so, with that very short introduction, i'd like to bring up sfmta for their presentation. please hold your applause for the end. >> supervisor wiener, did you have a comment? supervisor wiener. >> thank you, and thank you, supervisor cohen, for calling a hearing on this very important subject, specifically car sharing. and i agree that it's extremely important that we provide car-sharing access in all parts of the city. and thankfully, particularly for those areas that are poorly served by other forms of transportation such as muni and taxicab service. and we do know that in some areas of the city, in particular districts 10 and 11, muni access is not as good as it is in other parts of the city, and cab access, taxicab access is at
it comes to or shared values, marriage equality, environment. we are a becon to the rest of the world when it comes to our sports. i was proud a couple years ago to carry the legislation around america's cup bid to work with mayor lee to work with the warriors. i'm particularly pleased to work with supervisor ferrell and 49ers organization to make sure we win this bid. in my first couple weeks i put in a call to a young man named jed york. along with colleagues who were new in 2009 we asked you to consider sticking around in the city. while we may someday curse you for stop take our blessed team out of the city, we love the fact we are working together on this bid. we love that our 49er also continue to play great football down the street. we love the fact we still have hometown pride in the best football team in the franchise. thank you. looking forward to getting this done. [applause] >> i want to reiterate two points and open up to questions, if you have them for the folks up here. this will be the most shared super bowl super bowl bid ever. that is the key, hash tag super bowl and help
and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city will not forget. it h
that demand and really the role the department of environment has played and will continue to play is to raise awareness about all of the alternative transit options to help people get out of their fossil fuel [speaker not understood] cars. specifically i want to mention we're agnostic as it comes to the type of model, the particular company. we really want to support options that work to, again, help us promote car sharing in general and ultimate transportation options to meet our [speaker not understood] reduction emission goals. i have materials we passed out to city employees and business and happy to answer any questions that you have. >> may i ask a question? thank you. i actually just have one question. since the launch of bmw's recent one way car sharing program, could you talk to us a little about the benefits we're getting out of the program where they're working the downtown area? >> so, the bmw car sharing program, the reason that we got behind raising awareness about the launch of that program in san francisco is it's unique in that it added 50 plug-in electric vehicles to the sui
transportation fund for clean air revenues support. these are typically lead by the department of environment. one project that is flagged on your hand out for delivery issues is being led by the air district. this is the regional bike share project. i won't cover this. but it's a 12 to 24-month pilot program being done in the south bay select locations on the peninsula to test out bike sharing. i think the air district is experiencing the challenges we face with multiple sponsors. it's not going as fast as we can. we have dug into it a little bit. we are worried about cost controls for staff support cost and can report that the sfmta staff has been diligent in locating space. i think we are well positioned to get our bike sharing part of project out quickly. pedestrian projects, these are ones that we will have locations in each district. we have a larger list that i asked to be determined locations on curb ramps, what you see here, this is last year's allocation at 175 curb ramps. these have an independent of coordination with other projects. one of actions is approving dpw to kirkham. they
in environmental factors this is something that involves the city environment. and it's something that dirties the environment and we're involved in keeping a clean area in the school and city. while our impact isn't great we do give people an outlet to help their community rather than hurt it and we do teach them what kind of real impact it does have, both monetarily and to people and their quality of life. >> thank you. at this time i will open public comment on item no. 36789 seeing none, public comment is now closed. [ gavel ] made chair? >> yes i'm just looking right now the applicant is under 18 years old and in the charter all members of boards and commissions must be of legal voting age unless the authorizing legislation sets a position for someone under 18. so i'm checking that right now before you take a vote on it. >> okay. then if we may, if we could -- i will take comments first, but maybe we can continue this item to a later portion of the meeting. i would want to find a way to support this applicant, because i know we have a lot of young people engaged in this activity and i
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
straight about 10 years ago. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to
, about hoour environment, how to improve life for more people, how to make an expensive city more affordable to more people, how to utilize the strengths of the city as a great tourist city. how we can get more folks to come and experience the wonders of the city. maybe they will make their stake here. these panel members have decided to make their stake here. they risked reputation, may be small amounts of money. if they had a lot of money, they may not have had to start this. they have also done it for the right reasons. they want to experience the city in a different way, but one that is in the tradition of san francisco and is reflective of mine, welcoming more people to share in the economy. hopefully the right reasons will create more jobs and get more entrepreneurs involved. i have often said this can be the city for the 100%. everybody can have a chance to fulfill their dreams and make sure they can have a stable income for themselves and their families. i think we are on the verge of discussing things that would invite other members of our city family, department heads, t
approval rating -- of an approval rating in this environment getting thrown out, getting rejected. caller: he covers politics for the "philadelphia inquirer." the poll out this morning -- results available online. thank you for being with us. let's give back your phone calls. mike joins us from pennsylvania, democrat line. good morning. caller: good morning. my question is, with the controversy around the voter i.d. issue, the republican legislature suppressing turnout, do you think this will in any way suppress turnout and, if so, will it be enough to effect the margins in any way? thanks. host: thanks for the call. guest: last march, the legislature passed a law that requires pennsylvania voters to show up with one of six approved photo id is. if you did not have one in the meantime, the state would provide you with one. you had to go through certain procedures to get a photo id. more recently, in the last few weeks, a state judge simply set aside that particular provision of the law so that pennsylvanian is on november 6 -- you'll be asked to show one of those six forms of id. if you d
as garden for the environment, raise the roof, the little city garden, [speaker not understood], please touch community garden, eco sf school farm at the school of the arts, the veggie table at third and pa lou, the treasure island [speaker not understood], the farm that recently got together at the has valley playground and hayes valley farm. we recognize that successful communities are a part of a sustainable environment. we recognize our responsibility to all the relationships that make -- and we will make decisions with all of these thoughts in mind as our integral communities include our volunteers, our supporters, our partners, and the folks who live right around us. >> i'm sorry, but the other one gets two minutes. so, we may call you back up afterwards to have you finish your statement. but we have to sort of -- >>> i want to thank the general opportunity for community input, for community participation and for neighborhood feedback. >> we're with you completely. we'll call you back up if you need to finish the statement. >>> hi, my name is jim warshel and i've been involved wit
% and brutal in any environment and especially when other budgets hasn't been slashed as much, and understanding it might upset the apple cart so to speak, but i don't think we can be afraid of that in g we have to innovate. to some degree and maybe your department faces a challenge and labeled innovation capital of the world, however you want to label it and in the center of technology globally and i think we are expected to innovate. so what are some of the things that have to happen? what environments do you have to see -- let's say it's a centralization issue. what are issues that have to take place to have that dialogue happening? to me as i read through the report and i don't know about you president chiu, there seems to be an issue here. and progress is being made and that is great but is it fast enough? when i tell people i am on lotus notes for email it's a round laughter all along and what needs to take place. >> let me say two things about the conversation and let me put it out there how i perceive the comments and the reports and supervisor your comments. number
of the energy. and we didn't talk about the effects of the ways we would get it on either the environment or, more broadly, on the globe. >> nonetheless, did the debates matter? do you think they've had an impact on the campaign? >> yes, and what we, what we saw across the debates is what we expected to see. we saw learning about those issues that were addressed. more accurate placement of candidates on the areas in which they differ. what we didn't see is more accurate placement on areas that they're similar because the news never stresses areas in which they're similar. but nonetheless, we've seen learning across the debates in our annenberg survey. >> but my sense is that when there is no penalty for lying or as jonathan swift says in the last part of "gulliver's", for saying the thing that is not so, that the things one learns about what people say are completely irrelevant. governor romney has changed his position on just about everything throughout his entire career. and that, i believe, bedevils the fact checkers who will say, "well, his official position is this, but then he did that
in the beginning of the game. >> we come to a difficult environment. they are a great fans. they are almost as goods as ours. they are great fans and they make it difficult. we've done a really good job. a lot of times you're coming, there's awkward weather conversation. taking to the game plan? >> fired to the chargers. first quarter, edwards richardson, avoids some san diego defenders. 46 yards. and late 4th quarter. san diego down 7-6. and up and full. that's good news to san diego, loses in the afc west. aren't those the ugliest uniform you've seen. ben roth listberger scrambling. pittsburgh over washington. roth listberger threw for three touchdowns. one yard scored to will johnson. and they approved to 4-3. 30 miles an hour gusts to philadelphia. eagles, falcons game. falcons matt ryan to drew davis in the back of the end zone. davis gets both feet down. 2nd quarter, 14-7 falcons. lions connects to julio jones. beats -- and that's the 63-yard touchdown. falcons win 30-17. they are still unbeatenned at 7- 0. the nascar for you, dale earn hart, jr., down to martin dale. and later, jimmy
executed well from the very beginning of the game. >> we've come into the very difficult environment. it's a rough crowd to play in front of. they're great, they're great fans they're almost as good as ours. but they're great fans. and they make it difficult on us and we've done a really good job. the two times i've been here blocking out those distractions. a lot of times you come in leer and there's some awkward weather situations. we've done a good job fighting the distractions and finding ways to get a win and come in here. >>> the rangers were hoping for a loss by san diego in cleveland. first quarter, browns' rookie trent richardson breaks the tackle. 26-yard touchdown run and the browns led 7-6. that was the only score. late fourth quarter, 7-6. san diego down by a point. fourth and 10 philip rivers' pass tipped incomplete. cleveland wins it's ugly but they won it and here's what it all means. the saints and broncos are playing right now. the denver loses the raiders will be in a tie for first place in the afc west. how about that? >>> the 49ers hit prime time tomorrow night again
this kind of seemingly open economy into vick victims -- victims, creating an environment where it's difficult to move up and young lebanese men and women leave the country to find jobs elsewhere whether it's in the gulf, europe, or the united states, and you see them in various places although the country's pretty small soçv' lebanese, the lebanese economy actually provided syria with a gate to the world in the 1980s, and that gate was a two-way gate so you will get the products that were not actually sold in the syria market officially through lebanon in the 1980s and provide goods to scrux later of the population, and the upper lay eric and then in the 1990s when the trades were more open, lebanon continued to be one of the ways that -- through which this took place, but in the 80s, lebanon and turkey were the two places where the illegal trades and smuggling allowed the black market to thrive and created a process of accumulation that literally created new stratas, now groups that created an interest in the stability of the regime. hence, when we talk about the syria regime, a
to tell right now from the vix if the environment out there is going to be more normalized for the next several months." dan deming of stutland equities also says vix futures continue to indicate there is still uncertainty, and the upcoming election could play a role in wild swings in the market. 1,100 new employees start work at chrysler today. that's in addition to the 7,000 new workers since chrysler exited chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2009. the car company also plans to add 900 to 1,000 workers at a truck plant by march. most of the workers will be on a new, four-day, 10-hour schedule that includes fridays, saturdays, mondays and tuesdays. the new schedule reduces the cost of running the plant and cuts down on overtime pay. u.s. car dealers are ticked off with tesla. the electric car company started selling its model "s" luxury hatchback through its own stores rather than traditional dealerships. it eliminates, for instance, the $1300 cut car dealers get from each of the 12.8 million cars sold in the u.s. last year. some dealers have already filed lawsuits. they're concerned that other,
environment, in these countries is relatively more stable. >> last year's massive floods in thailand forced many japanese auto plants to shut down, but their operations have resumed. toyota and nissan plan to expand production in thailand. >>> myanmar emerged from nearly five decades of military rule last year and introduced democratic reforms. now it's becoming a magnet for international investment. china is leading the way. thailand and south korea are also major investors. japan lags behind. but japanese executives are rushing to close the gap. nhk world's satoru aoyama reports from yangon. >> reporter: he's in charge of overseas operations for an osaka-based logistics company. up to now, the company has used a local contractor to do business in myanmar. but executives think it might be time to set up shop. they sent him to size up conditions in yangon. >> translator: the country is full of energy. there is a sense of optimism. people believe tomorrow will be better than today. >> reporter: this japanese sewing factory is a client of kotaka's firm. it produces suits in myanmar that have
better for us. we thank the supervisors to put such an emphasis on improving the environment for us. thank you. >> thank you. i'm going to call up a couple more name cards. [ reading speakers' names ] >> good afternoon supervisors, thank you, my name is jorge potio, a lifetime resident of san francisco and i want to start by recognizing the hard work that has been put into the legislation. to those affects and to those who are supporting the people affected by this issue, really, it's serving as kind of a buffer to what could have been a real crisis. as a housing rights advocate for the mission collaborative for the past five years and a friend of many people who have had bed bugs i have wintered firsthand the devastating affects on lives. and so i can really appreciate this a[pro-rb/] and thank you to the working group that put this together. it puts in place procedures and policies that make it easier for housing advocates and tenant communitis to navigate this process, but we know we can put what we like on paper and promise to follow it to the best our abilitis and commit t
helping the environment because it takes cars off the road. less people have to own cars. never having owned a car, i think that is a good thing. it helps me live a healthier lifestyle. i am excited to be on the panel. >> thanks, jessica. i was putting together a presentation recently with the logos of companies in the sharing economy on the map near our office at eco dash working place --at a coworking place. i counted 20 share economy places in my neighborhood. there are new companies launched every week. this is just a small sample, some the leaders in san francisco. jay, give us some background on the sharing economy working group and how you think it benefits san francisco, including underserved communities. >> it is historic we are being thoughtful, looking forward in shaping the policies. mayor lee and board president david chiu and the supervisors announced the sharing economy working group. the idea is to look at the issues at play as well as understand the benefits of the sharing economy, whether environmental or economic. you can see with the companies that there is tremendo
director of environment in our city has issued a goal for 2020, being mission -- emission free, carbon neutral. that is something that when you think about the economic impact of these new business models, it can contribute quite greatly to that. i am going to answer the question a little bit differently -- i have been inspired by this space considerably. there's a lot more opportunity. cars, so many assets we have in our society. as a city, we own buildings, cubicles, museums, golf courses, so much that we have -- >> yes, but it is our property, right? >> yes. that is a very good point. stewards of these resources, and they are often underutilized resources, so how do we improve access to those? there is a lot to learn from this that could be applied to the public comments. >> thank you. let's open it up. do we have a microphone for people to come to? ok, we will just it old school. if you have a question, raise your hand, and speak loudly. concise questions will be greatly appreciated. >> [inaudible] >> did everyone here that? ok. >> something that is really amazing about the sharing
fundamentally passing -- pass and then turning them into interactive environments. it is giving tools to teachers. when kids get together, they are going to talk to each other and talk to the teachers. they will be rated on how good they are expressing themselves and interacting with their peers. >> the new book from salman khan is called "the one world schoolhouse." we have just scratched the surface on a very deep subject. it was a delight to have you on the program. that is our show for tonight. as always, thanks for watching. and keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with -- a look at the final weeks of this campaign. that is next time. we will see you then. >>here is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we
that switch backs are valid and necessary given the operating environment. they have worked on reducing the switchbacks and keeping the public informed and would further denigate service and safety. the jury answers, "that's what we're getting at that muni think it is switch backs are a normal way of business". other transportation systems were aghast, appalled that a transit system could inconvenience their customers so cavalierly and we want them to have the feeling that we are doing a good job" when they deem them unavoidable. recommendation two, contact and learn from paris not resorting to switchbacks regularly. muni agrees there is room for improvement and they will reach out to their peers to study their standard operating procedures but note the claim that others are using procedures similar to muni. the jury answers "the jury approves part of the response about contacting peers. we hope that you contact those systems that were on our list. these systems are seen by the controller as being similar to muni, and have higher reliability and passenger ratings than muni. if
that stressful, inflamed environment the fat cells will naturally take you back to your playing weight and you stay fuller for longer. as an internist who takes care of patients, do you recommend this to your patients? >> i do because it has other benefits. they same the patients had a decrease in cholesterol, the ldl and an improvement in hl -- hdl which is the good cholesterol. and they said patients that were obese showed some resistance in insulin resistance. in many ways, it's the holy gray. it's not just the pill. don't go home thinking it's the pill but with the tools we have this becomes a very interesting new tool for us. you guys interested? i thought you might be. jaws are dropping. i'm going to tell you more when we return. dd [applause] >> we're back talk by the newest, fastest fat buster, garcinia cambogia extract. want to know how well it works? well, meet missy. this is what she looked like before she began taking garcinia cambogia. while she began taking it she lost 10 pounds in less than four months. here's what she looks like now. you look really good. i don't even have a wa
them into interactive environments. it is giving tools to teachers. when kids get together, they are going to talk to each other and talk to the teachers. they will be rated on how good they are expressing themselves and interacting with their peers. >> the new book from salman khan is called "the one world schoolhouse." we have just scratched the surface on a very deep subject. it was a delight to have you on the program. that is our show for tonight. as always, thanks for watching. and keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with -- a look at the final weeks of this campaign. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunge
of how tough the environment is. bge is asking people for patience. the winds are still strong and it will take awhile to restore. >> let's puts it to you this way. we will be on for the rest of the night. we'll be on for the rest of the overnight. this is historic, a matter of your safety. to find your regular programming. >> we have a list of your family show's. vernal 463, come exaft -- comcast and direc-tv 2-2 our subchannels. those are the places to go. >> we'll put this on the crawl. >> we'll talk up until the first block of diane sawyer. we'll have her tell what the national outlook is and we'll come right back. >> this is a storm affecting over 60 million people. >> can i get an estimate how much time, ballpark time? >> about two minutes. >> this is amazing. it's kind of, you see it's pivoting around. this will probably come south to north, you know. >> so much information. it's unbelievable. a couple things, first off, the center will be crossing over northern delaware and northern baltimore county. we're going to have a period up to hurricane force winds from now unti
from financials. how much worse will it get? >> it's also the regulatory environment. the barclays particularly in this country, a whole focus on bank management pay and so on. so clearly they're trying to respond to that regulatory and social push for lower pay to bank management. so with all of this in mind, if they can control costs, they can refocus business on either higher margin business or better quality business, at some point will be profitable. >> it broaden out to the market in general, you point out that, yes, earnings have been relatively in line with the paths. beating estimates like two-third of the time, but falling short on the revenue side. it doesn't necessarily point to a stronger market longer term. >> to me the early season in the u.s. has been poor. share negative for the first time in three years year on year. and revenue growth will be one of the key metrics to look at in the current environment. if nominal terms these countries cannot generate growth, what ask z. it mean for the global economy. >> 63% of cash flow is going to buy backs. what were the sect
or were the brokers not ready to operate in that environment? this is a big question. i will tell you this, liz, you want exchanges to be open now. i don't care what anybody -- a storm should not shut down capitalism. liz: wait even if it's --? >> no. liz: you shut down the floor but keep the electronic trading going. >> in this environment we can trade stocks in milliseconds. a storm, rain should not stop the new york stock exchange from opening its system. it should not stop the nasdaq or any of them. a small investor, maybe some trader can't get to work that works at goldman sachs, that's fine. but the bottom line is, the average investor should be able to trade stocks, buy a stock right now when they want. the system should not be shut down because of the storm. and it's absurd when you think about it. we've had years and years of technology -- liz: well traders were e-mailing me and said i'm upset, i wanted to go to work, i can handle this. >> it is one thing to be physically on the floor. the question is for a small investor and these markets are for the public too, by the way. the a
supplies are going down. they are going down because of the burdens and regulatory environments shutting down power plants. what we have to do is look at my energy plan. it is an all of the above approach. we have to ensure that we put more plants in action. more nuclear facilities so america continues to lead economically. if we put ourselves at an economic disadvantage because we are meeting emissions targets that are already doing better than most industrialized we hold let's make sure anybody else accountable in the world. start worrying about the american energy and american economy. the pipeline, that is thousands of jobs that can be created right now in america with a signature from president obama. that needs to happen. let's make sure we maximize our missions controls, we utilize natural gas, and we look at expanding our nuclear options here in this country. >> 30 seconds. >> renewals can take care of -- i do not claim renewable can take care of all our energies at this time. we need to take a big step forward. we find ourselves unable to when we have people beholden to oil and
declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of the war and yet we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and death of the vulnerabilities. and so, what we are trying to do in the series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad and congress and people around the country can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. we have a pretty simple proposition. you can either embrace the kind of approach commerce one wilson has embraced. she signed the pledge to support the cut cabin balance program. that's a tea party approach to balancing the budget and it has no new revenues even for the wealthiest americans. and it is so draconian that would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time or we can member is a balanced approach. that's what i support and i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration and those upper income e
it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. c2 >> nrator: then, when he wasas ten, h mothesent him t to ve with his grandparents >> i think is natura assume thayour fbe absent, then fm a reship wi yr ster, and en be separat from him and ber sepad fr yr mo and go liv yougrandpar o at that point you don' ally knoat w it mushave bn profound unseng. >> h early l a cstant stream opeople lving, h beg left his moer, his ther, his grandpar cstany moving his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home.mo >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that his grandmother was an alcoholic, too. >> narrator: but barry had gotten lucky. hawaii's most
in a highly politicized environment, as the white house and the state department has collected informations, they have gotten it to the american public as soon as they could. host: angie in jacksonville, fla., good morning. go ahead. last check? moving on to barbara. are you with us? go ahead. you are on the air. caller: 1 americans wake up on november 7th, they need to make the right choice to reelect president obama as the president of this great country. they have the corporations' buying and running their country. they will regret their choices forever. every day that this president has done until now and everything he will do after he has inherited this, bankruptcy of the whole country from his own party. these guys have shipped off the jobs to foreign countries. i lived through that. i have been a refugee all my life. host: sue dvorsky, any response to that caller? guest: there are a few important points that you bring up. i do believe that voters in florida, iowa, and voters across the country understand the depth of what this president and his team faced when they came in. today is
people think is the changing media environment. you mentioned we have not had prosecutions of reporters are media organizations, but i am wondering if your thoughts, and the challenges posed by the changing media landscape, the emergence of new organizations, new technologies that might not be, you know, as responsible end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints t
thinking about growth we need to think about the animals and the environment and the ecology as well. >> all right. mr. lagos. >> yes. one of the reasons i moved to san francisco 35 years ago was because there was not a large population here. i moved from los angeles and it's grown 50,000 people in those years. i don't want to see it grow further per se and i'm not a fan of developing more housing but to answer the question if we add more housing i would say loosen up the rules to allow homeowners to create inlaw apartments and that way you open up unit availability at some level for additional housing. other than that i would be opposed to any new construction of any major land use of development for housing including the three major projects in the pipeline. >> mr. rogers. >> if there is going to be development it could be in the trans bays terminal that is truly close to rapid transit. walking distance to bart. walking distance to the train that heads down south. this would be an ideal place for a development to occur. a place like park merced where you have 17,000 people w
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. ♪ lou: new accusations today from vice-president joe biden hitting governor romney and republicans on taxes in a campaign event in wisconsin. >> you cannot erase what you have already done. they voted to extend tax cuts for the wealthy giving $500 trillion tax cut so 120,000 families. lou: that's a lot of money. 500 trillion. you have to love the vice-president, his view o things and, his expression. for a little perspective, the national debt is 16 trillion. we'll just leave it there. my next guest says there is no caseon economic grounds to raise taxes. joining me now, senior economic writer for the wall street journal, stephen moore, author of the new bok, the truth about opportunity, taxes, and wealth in america. great to have you with us. >> great to be with you. can i say something? this is really the problem in washington. you know, and it's not just joe biden. these politicians can't tell the difference between a billion and a trillion. the the numbers are so big now, everybody's eyes glaze over. a trillion dollars, million million. all lot o
as well as well as working on parks. so in the environment i need to tell everyone, that muni is a priority, without muni the city will come to a stand still and it is not working properly right now. other cities can do transit systems even with snow and terrible weather, and san francisco can't. we need to fix it. i've worked in the green jobs area. i have helped push through go solar sf, which has created hundreds of jobs in san francisco and i need to do more of that for the citizens of san francisco. i will close with the idea that san francisco and district five in particular need a hard-working supervisor who has a stable background and a proven track record of making hard decision and getting things done. and i'm that person. >> hi, my name is thea starby and i am asking you to make me your next district five supervisor. as a long time neighborhood activist, i am able to speak and more importantly listen to people from all walks of life and all, professions. >> i have gotten these groups to talk and listen to each other. i have got involved in politics after 2007 double
. the department of transportation, explosive devices take place, some indicators in environment, are you looking for any type of unattended packages or boxes in high risk areas, liquids, mist -- this is going to be a biological or chemical release. numerous sick or dead animals or birds. any objects that does not seem right, do you want to touch it? i'm not sure what this is, let me jostle it around. no, no, don't do that. move away and report it. remember that. a cell phone, a call, calling 911, using your cell phone may detonate that device. so obviously don't use your cell phone. go to a hard wire phone, land line phone, outside, and call 911. what do we do as first responders. when we come up do we use our walkie talkies or radio? no. you go to a hard wire phone, call it in and get the information back because it may detonate that using the radio frequency. remember we talked about suspected terrorism is a stop sign for you as nerts. you do not want to get hurt. any questions on the terrorism? bnice is not nice. incident takes place, it takes place here on the left side, this is called the h
had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as the new domain of war and yet, we realized that maybe one in 1000 people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and depth of the vulnerabilities. so what we are trying to do in the zero day series is to take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad to congress and people around the country can understand, and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. >> host: mr. o'harrow if you look at cyberspace in the united states right now, how would you describe security overall? let's just describe maybe break-ins in the neighborhood. >> guest: in the spirit of explanatory mission we have to can't really talk about cyberspace and the united states. a computer user in washington d.c. or in wichita or san francisco is effectively working shoulder-to-shoulder with a computer worker in beijing or in moscow. there there is literally milliseconds of difference in space and time in cyberspace. so i thought i woul
as well that could be related to toxins and the environment. other than attendance today can better speak to those concerns that if you limit the conceptual topic to radiological concerns alone we're missing out orthctionv bigger issue wall street the overall environmental health on the island. now, we've already heard talk about this lack of trust with various agencies and i'd like to carry that a little bit step further. an issue which is confounding this discussion is the level of disinterrupt between community members, tida, the navy and san francisco government overall. over the last year we've been subjected to censorship of our newsletter, had to sign off an attempt to radically change our leases. [speaker not understood] the darkness over and over again and we have been condescended to by a city that treats us more like a colony or out post than an integral part of the city. how do we as residents much of treasure island, we citizens of san francisco know who we can trust on the issues being discussed today when our needs have long been neglected and trivialized? we need you and y
environment. however, we do have a number of concerns about what we're hearing. for example, cdph itself seems to be an agency of two minds when it comes to treasure island. on the one hand, if you look at cdph's comment and historical radiological assessment quoted in the papers, you would see an agency that appears to be extremely concerned about the quality of the characterization of the radiation out there. on the other hand, when you hear reports and see other materials that are being distributed among the tenants that say there is no health problems, you become confused about what the agency's true position is relative to this problem. and, so, it's difficult for us to expect the public or organizations like my own to have clarity about the cdph's position when cdph's position seems to be in and of itself unclear. as to gamma surface surveys, my consultants tell me that while radium is a rather robust source of gamma, other sources of radiation that may be present on the island may be less so. so, it's important to know how the instruments were calibrate and had for what brad sources in
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